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T.I.M.E.

Overview

Intended for healthcare professionals outside of the US only.

Evolving the concept of T.I.M.E.

Building a progressive clinical decision support tool for systematic, consistent clinical practice

With chronic wound prevalence growing at around 12% annually1, and increasing pressure on resources, there is a need for consistent, intuitive clinical practice that expands beyond the wound and provides structured, measurable outcomes.

Through consultation with leading wound care experts, we’ve built on the globally endorsed T.I.M.E.2-3 concept to develop a comprehensive clinical decision support framework that now encompasses a full holistic patient review.

Designed to evolve with future clinical developments, our T.I.M.E. clinical decision support tool seeks to build clearer, more comprehensive information to facilitate consistent, efficient and cost-effective wound bed preparation and treatment.

Choose the right treatment, for the right wound, at the right time 

Assess patient, wellbeing and wound.

Bring in a multidisciplinary team and informal carers to promote holistic patient care.

Control or treat underlying causes and barriers to wound healing.

Decide treatment, using T.I.M.E. principles

Evaluate and reassess treatment and wound management outcomes.

 

A healthcare professional must always rely on his or her own professional clinical judgment when deciding whether to use a particular product when treating a particular patient. Smith & Nephew does not dispense medical advice and recommends that healthcare professionals be trained in the use of any particular product before using it on patients.

 

Begin patient assessment >

 

Making a positive difference every time

Addressing current challenges with a patient-focused approach

The implementation of a standardised clinical practice is essential to meet the growing global challenge of chronic wounds. Why? Unhealed wounds can cause a considerable cost burden and significantly impact patient wellbeing. Appropriate and realistic planning should be holistic, systematic and evidence-based4-5.

 

Watch Dr Leanne Atkin discuss the T.I.M.E. principle


Watch now >

 

When? A full holistic assessment of the patient’s full circumstances should be carried out on admission or on first contact in the community, establishing a baseline for care through observation, questioning and examination4-5.

 

How? Ideally through a structured, multidisciplinary tool, developed and endorsed by an international group of wound healing experts2-3,6, to provide patient-centric and cost-effective treatment7.

Read the study that examined the practical application of a structured clinical decision support tool >

 

Understanding and identifying chronic wounds  >

 

Helping you get CLOSER TO ZERO delay in wound healing.

 

Referencing

1) Guest et al. The economic burden that acute and chronic wounds impose on an average clinical commissioning group/health board in the UK.JWC. 2017; 26(6): 292-303.
2) Schultz GS, Sibbald RG, Falanga V, et al. Wound bed preparation: a systematic approach to wound management. Wound Repair Regen. 2003;11(Suppl 1):S1-28;
3) Leaper DJ, Schultz G, Carville K, Fletcher J, Swanson T, Drake R. Extending the T.I.M.E. concept: what have we learned in the past 10 years? Int Wound J. 2012;9 (Suppl 2):1-19.
4) Jones ML, (2016) Wound healing Series 2.4, Part 1. Wound assessment. British journal of wound care assistants 11(10).
5) Wilson M, (2012) Understanding the basics of wound assessment. Wound Essentials 7(2): 8–12;
6) Smith & Nephew Data on File Internal Report. Zmuda A, Dowsett C, Weir D et al. Achieving Systematic Practice Consistency Through T.I.M.E. POP Standardisation. October 2018.

Evolution of T.I.M.E.

Intended for healthcare professionals outside of the US only.

Standing the test of T.I.M.E.

Understanding and evolving wound bed assessment and preparation

How did we develop our T.I.M.E. clinical decision support tool?

Originally conceived in 2003 by a group of wound management experts, the T.I.M.E. concept aimed to provide a rational and systematic approach to wound bed preparation for non-healing wounds1.

By identifying the barriers to wound healing and recognising how to remove them, T.I.M.E. outlined practical and informed wound bed preparation through clinical observations and recommended treatments to achieve target outcomes1.

 

Watch: The past, present and future of wound care

Watch now >

 

Adoption and adaptation

T.I.M.E. was updated in 2005 to incorporate a wound assessment tool based on the increased understanding of epidermal edge migration2.

Evidence to support chronic wound bed preparation was prioritised to justify the cost of additional resources to improve patient outcomes. To complement the T.I.M.E. approach, a patient-centric care approach sought to facilitate treatment success2-3

But, like the challenge of wounds, T.I.M.E. cannot stand still.

 

The evolution and future of T.I.M.E.

Our understanding of the need for a wider, multidisciplinary holistic approach has been incorporated into a simple, consistent review of all patient circumstances to promote best clinical practice4, alongside other chronic wound developments such as:

  • The need for repetitive maintenance debridement and wound cleansing.
  • Bacterial continuum and biofilm concepts and the need to address antibiotics resistance through the use of topical antiseptics.
  • The importance of moisture balance and the use of advanced dressings to manage exudate.
  • Developing novel treatment modalities to improve epithelial advancement.

Our wound assessment method will continue to evolve and reflect advances in wound therapy, guiding clinical practice in chronic wound management to improve treatment success and patient outcomes4.

 

View our Evidence in Focus summary of T.I.M.E. >

  

Helping you get CLOSER TO ZERO delay in wound healing.

 

A healthcare professional must always rely on his or her own professional clinical judgment when deciding whether to use a particular product when treating a particular patient. Smith & Nephew does not dispense medical advice and recommends that healthcare professionals be trained in the use of any particular product before using it on patients.

 

Referencing

1) Schultz GS, Sibbald RG, Falanga V, et al. Wound bed preparation: a systematic approach to wound management. Wound Repair Regen. 2003;11(Suppl 1):S1-28.
2) Schultz G, Mozingo D, Romanelli M,Claxton K. Wound healing and T.I.M.E.; new concepts and scientifi c applications. Wound Repair Regen. 2005;13(Suppl 4):S1-11.
3) Dowsett C, Newton H. Wound bed preparation: T.I.M.E. in practice. Wounds UK. 2005;1(3):58-70.
4) Leaper DJ, Schultz G, Carville K, Fletcher J, Swanson T, Drake R. Extending the T.I.M.E. concept: what have we learned in the past 10 years? Int Wound J. 2012;9 (Suppl 2):1-19